Descendants Roll Call Of

Noteworthy Regiments That Served

During The Petersburg Campaign

 

 

Honoring Confederate Soldiers

Who Fought With Valor And Persistence

 

 

Francine Stanley

great great grandaughter of

Private William D. Harvey, Co. I

56th Virginia Infantry

 

R. W. Rosser

descendant of

Maj. General Thomas Lafayette Rosser

Cavalry Division Commander

Elizabeth Flanagan

great granddaughter of

William Joseph Howerton, Co. C

3rd Virginia Cavalry

 

William R. Ormond

grandson of

Sgt. L. Thomas Ormond, Co. A

5th Alabama Battalion

 

Grady Peeler

great great grandson of

1st Sgt. Paul Peeler, Co. C

57th North Carolina Infantry

Grady Peeler

great great grandson of

Pvt. O. M. Holshouser, Co. C

46th North Carolina Infantry

 

Grady Peeler

great grand nephew of

Pvt. Elisha Mack Peeler

25th North Carolina Infantry

 

Grady Peeler

great grand nephew of

Pvt. Wiley G. Peeler

25th North Carolina Infantry

Rita Majors

great granddaughter of

Pvt. Seaborn Thornton

59th Alabama Infantry

 

Barbara Webb

descendant of

Benjamin Moses Wesley

Hampton Legion, Gary's Brigade

 

Barbara Webb

family of

Zachariah Edward Wesley

Hampton Legion, Gary's Brigade

Sherry Cavanaugh

great granddaughter of

Pvt. John Joseph Page, Co. A

48th Mississippi Infantry

 

Susanne Files

great grand niece of

Capt. Thomas James Hadley, Co. A

3rd Arkansas Infantry

 

Bob Lovell

great grandson of

1st Sgt. Peter Boyer Perry, Co. E

9th Regiment, Florida Infantry

Joshua Evandon Keys

great great grandson of

Pvt. Richard W. Follin, Co. B

18th South Carolina Infantry

 

Paulette Lollar

great great great granddaughter of

Sgt. Zachariah Claxton, Co. E

48th Regiment, Georgia Infantry

 

Paulette Lollar

her 4th great uncle was

Pvt. Augustus G. Powell, Co. E

48th Regiment, Georgia Infantry

Paulette Lollar

her 3rd great uncle was

Sgt. Crayton L. Powell, Co. F

48th Regiment, Georgia Infantry

 

Paulette Lollar

her 4th great uncle was

Pvt. Robert L. Powell, Co. F

48th Regiment, Georgia Infantry

 

 

Paulette Lollar

her 4th great uncle was

Pvt. Virgil A. Powell, Co. E

48th Regiment, Georgia Infantry

 

Paulette Lollar

her 4th great uncle was

Pvt. John Lawson Anderson, Co. F

48th Regiment, Georgia Infantry

 

Paulette Lollar

great great great granddaughter of

Pvt. Joel Anderson, Co. B

64th Regiment, Georgia Infantry

 

 

Paulette Lollar

her 3rd great uncle was

Pvt. William Wesley Fulmer, Co. I

22nd South Carolina Infantry

 

Paulette Lollar

her 3rd great uncle was

Pvt. James Riley Fulmer, Co. I,

22nd South Carolina Infantry

 

Paulette Lollar

her 3rd great uncle was

Levi Fulmer, Co. A

2nd South Carolina Rifles

 

Cindy Deal Scott

descendant of

Pvt. Franklin W. Deal, Co. G

42nd North Carolina Troops

 

James Walters

great great grandson of

Pvt. Charles Enoch Jeffreys, Co. E

46th North Carolina Troops

 

 

Bill Bowers

great grand nephew of

Cpl. John W. Bowers, Co. B

27th Regiment, Georgia Infantry

 

Bill Bowers

great great grand nephew of

Sgt.. Henry Mann, Co. I

27th Regiment, Georgia Infantry

Bill Bowers

great great grand nephew of

Pvt. Peter Kemp, Co. I

27th Regiment, Georgia Infantry

 

Grey Hodges

great grandson of

Pvt. Floyd Lemuel Hodges, Co. E

60th Regiment of Alabama Infantry

 

Patty Alexander Waller

great great grand niece of

Pvt. Stanhope W. Alexander, Co. H

35th North Carolina Troops

Brian Hodges

1st cousin 4 times removed of

Pvt. Wiley Hodges, Co. E

60th Regiment of Alabama Infantry

 

Grey Hodges

family of

Pvt. Samuel Lemuel Hodges, Co. E

60th Regiment of Alabama Infantry

 

Brian Hodges

1st cousin 4 times removed of

Pvt. Coleman Hodges, Co. A

3rd Alabama Infantry Battalion

Brian Hodges

1st cousin 4 times removed of

Pvt. Joseph Hodges, Co. E

60th Regiment of Alabama Infantry

 

Brian Hodges

1st cousin 4 times removed of

Pvt. Foreman Hosey Hodges, Co. E

60th Regiment of Alabama Infantry

 

Brian Hodges

1st cousin 4 times removed of

Pvt. Redding Hodges, Co. E

60th Regiment of Alabama Infantry

Brian Hodges

1st cousin 4 times removed of

Pvt. Thomas Hodges, Co. E

60th Regiment of Alabama Infantry

 

Brian Hodges

1st cousin 4 times removed of

Pvt. Jordan Hodges, Co. E

60th Regiment of Alabama Infantry

 

Carole Shelton

descendant of

Lt. Warren Lumpkin Story, Co. F

59th Regiment of Georgia Infantry

Ken Bachand

great grandson of

Cpl. Sidney B. Swan, Co. B

64th Regiment of Georgia Infantry

 

TMC Oliver R. Wesley USN (Retired)

descendant of

Pvt. B. M. Wesley, Co. E

4th Alabama Cavalry Batt. (Love's)

 

TMC Oliver R. Wesley USN (Retired)

descendant of

Pvt. Z. E. Wesley, Co. A

4th Alabama Cavalry Batt. (Love's)

Will Walker

great great great grandson of

2nd Sgt Franklin Jacob Geiger, Co. B

1st Regiment South Carolina Infantry (Hagood's)

 

Edwin B. Calvit

great great grandson of

Pvt. Matthew P. Hamilton, Co. B

11th Alabama Infantry

 

Edwin B. Calvit

great grand nephew of

Pvt. Middleton A. Hamilton, Co. B

11th Alabama Infantry

Danny Powell

great great grandson of

Pvt. Robert L. Powell, Co. F

48th Georgia Infantry

 

Sharon Dalton

great great granddaughter of

Pvt. Jasper Newton Adams, Co. C

2nd Regiment South Carolina Rifles

 

Tim Savelle

great great great nephew of

Pvt. Joseph E. English, Battery A

11th Georgia Artillery Battalion

(Sumter Artillery)

Tim Savelle

great great great nephew of

Pvt. Thomas H. English, Battery A

11th Georgia Artillery Battalion

(Sumter Artillery)

 

Tim Savelle

1st cousin 3 times removed of

Pvt. Joel Wenel English, Battery A

11th Georgia Artillery Battalion

(Sumter Artillery)

 

James Howard Mayo III

great great great grandson of

Pvt. Jasper Newton Adams, Co. C

2nd Regiment South Carolina Rifles

Brent Mayo

great great great grandson of

Pvt. Jasper Newton Adams, Co. C

2nd Regiment South Carolina Rifles

 

Lloyd Fowler

great great great grandson of

Pvt. John James Misskelley, Co. G

Palmetto Sharpshooters

 

Col John K. Rowland, USAF (Ret)

great grand nephew of

Pvt. John G. Rowland, Co. H

57th North Carolina Troops

Norman R. Perdue

great great grandson of

Pvt. Isaiah Perdue

Capt. Hardwicke's Company (Lee Battery)

Virginia Light Artillery

 

Norman R. Perdue

great great grandson of

Cpl. James H. Godsey, Co. B

46th Regiment, Virginia Infantry

 

Derek H. Belflower

great grand nephew of

Pvt. William Henry H. Bellflower, Co. F

31st Regiment, Georgia Infantry

Clarence Sell

great great grandson of

Pvt. William Wesley Sell, Co. K

45th North Carolina Troops

 

Jerry Davis, MD

great grand nephew of

Pvt. Reason J. Davis, Co. E

60th Alabama Infantry Regiment

 

Jonathan W. Whiting

great great grandson of

Maj. Gen. William H.C. Whiting,

Commanding (May 1864)

Rick Hartline

great grand nephew of

Pvt. Solomon Hartline, Co. C

48th North Carolina Troops

 

Rick Hartline

great grand nephew of

Pvt. William Hartline, Co. C

48th North Carolina Troops

 

Franklin B. Strickler

great grandson of

Pvt. James A. Strickler

1st Rockbridge Artillery

 

Franklin B. Strickler

great grand nephew of

Pvt. William L.. Strickler

1st Rockbridge Artillery

 

 

Greg Caulley

5th great nephew of

Pvt. Thomas G. Galloway, Co. E

25th North Carolina Infantry

 

Jan Murphy-Caulley

2nd great granddaughter of

Pvt James F. Brown, Co. E.

48th Georgia Infantry

Jan Murphy-Caulley

3rd great niece of

Pvt. Samuel J. Brown, Co. E

48th Georgia Infantry

 

Jan Murphy-Caulley

3rd great niece of

Pvt. William Y. Brown, Co. E

48th Georgia Infantry

 

Jan Murphy-Caulley

3rd great niece of

Pvt. Lawson B. McDaniel, Co. E

48th Georgia Infantry

Jan Murphy-Caulley

4th great niece of

Cpl. Henry H. Beecher, Co. I

27th Georgia Infantry

 

Jan Murphy-Caulley

4th great niece of

Pvt. William A. Beecher, Co. I

27th Georgia Infantry

 

Jan Murphy-Caulley

4th great niece of

Pvt. Wilson F. Beecher, Co. I

27th Georgia Infantry

Jan Murphy-Caulley

2nd great niece of

Pvt. James McGauley, Co. I

27th Georgia Infantry

 

Roland W. Clements

great grandson of

Pvt. Jessie J. Clements, Co B.

3rd Regiment Georgia Infantry

 

Greg Holden

great great grandson of

Pvt. Alexander Holden, Co. E

22nd SouthCarolina Infantry

Bertha M. Hicks

great great great granddaughter of

Pvt. Charles M. Hicks, Co. D

30th Virginia Infantry

 

Robert Toombs Whitaker

great great grandson of

Pvt. J.A. Hatcher, Co. F

10th Georgia Infantry

 

Weldon Gosnell

great grandson of

Cpl. J.O.L. Abbott, Co. D

22nd SouthCarolina Infantry

 

 

 

The Remembrance Wall

At The National Museum Of The Civil War Soldier

Another Great Way To Honor The Memory Of Your American Civil War Soldier

click on this link

 

 

Soldier's Notes

Private William D. Harvey, 56th Virginia Infantry, Company I, was from the Charlotte County area of Madisonville. He wrote a letter to his wife on September 11, 1864, from the outskirts of Petersburg. Private William D. Harvey has a Confederate marker and is buried in the cemetery at Salem Baptist Church, Pamplin, Virginia.

William Joseph Howerton, Company C, 3rd. Virginia Calvary, resided in Cluster Springs, Virginia was wounded at Petersburg, VA and served with General Lee at Appotomax, VA. He was honored each year as the oldest living Confederate Soldier. He died in 1938.

1st Sgt. Paul Peeler, of the 57th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, Co. C., indicates that he was captured in Petersburg on April 3, 1865.

Benjamin Moses Wesley served in the Fourth Alabama Cavalry Battalion (Love’s) which was consolidated with the Phillips’ (GA) Legion, Wade Hampton’s Cavalry Battalion from May to 11 July 1864. Then they merged into the Jeff. Davis (MS) Cavalry Legion. They were involved in The Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, North Anna, 2nd Cold Harbor, Treviliam Station, and the Petersburg Siege.

Capt. Thomas Hadley, b. May 13, 1842, d. September 5, 1871, is buried at the Hamburg Cemetery, Ashley County, Arkansas. The 3rd Arkansas was serving in Longstreet's First Army Corps, Field's Division, Gregg's Brigade. They came down from Richmond as the battle progressed on April 2, 1865 and stabilized the Confederate lines, which allowed General Lee's orderly withdrawal from the Petersburg lines. Quotes from "They'll Do To Tie To!" 3rd. Ark. Infantry Regiment - C.S.A. by Capt. Calvin L. Collier, U.S.A.F: Enemy bullets were ripping through the brush like a hail storm, knocking down men in appalling numbers. Major Wilkins is down, killed instantly. Captain Hadley of "A" Company falls, stunned but not badly hurt." At Petersburg: "On July 19th T. J. Hadley of "A" Company was again struck down. This time he was shot in the head by a sharpshooter and put out of action for the balance of the war."

Capt. Thomas J. Hadley. Died in 1871 at 29 years of age. He never married.

 

As an ex-Confederate States Soldier, I appreciate your efforts in trying to gather up the deeds of that Grand Army of Southern boys and bid your association God Speed.

At Wedowee, Randolph County, Alabama in the early part of the year 1862. I enlisted in Company “G” 59th Regiment Alabama Infantry, Gracie’s Brigade. Our Company was commanded by Captain Gus Reeves, Lieut., Lucus and our Regiment by Colonel Hall. Adjutant Hall, brother of the Colonel. I do not now remember the names of their other officers. I took part in the following Battles: Pea Ridge (East Tennessee), Chickamauga, Richmond, VA, Petersburg, VA, Skirmish at Knoxville TN, and many skirmishes around Richmond and Petersburg.

I was in the ditches at Petersburg. I received a gunshot wound at the Battle of Petersburg and was in the ditches there when the Yankee tunneled under and blew us up and I sustained a broken collarbone and my head was injured from the explosions. It is impossible for me to narrate all the gloomy days of hand fighting, weary marches, sleepless nights and empty Haversacks that we passed through. I was under 20 years of age, when I left a comfortable home and dear parents and became one of the Southern Soldier Boys.

I have never regretted that I offered my services and did all that I could in defenses of my Country and our beautiful Flag, which though furled, I love it yet. I have tried to impress on the minds of my children that the Southern Soldiers were not traitors, but that the North was waging upon us a War of attempted subjugation.

God grant that through the instrumentality of your noble association, a truce and a just history of the Confederacy will be obtained. I was taken a prisoner of War at Petersburg and sent to Point Lookout Md Prison. I was there only a short time, until the sad tidings came of the surrender of Gen Robert E. Lee with the Army of Northern Virginia. I was discharged and Paroled at Point Lookout Md and returned to my house in Randolph County Alabama. I was born in Chambers County Alabama September 1st 1843. I have lived in Limestone County Alabama for quite a while, P.O. Maples Alabama.

Signed, Seaborn Thornton

Peter Boyer Perry was originally from Lancaster, South Carolina. In 1845, he was 19 years old and his younger brother Charles joined the U. S. Army in a frenzy of war excitement at the beginning of the War with Mexico. His mother was afraid that Charles would be killed, due to his youth and rashness, so she asked the older brother, Peter to enlist and go with him. They were in the Palmetto Battallion. After training, they were with the troops that landed in Vera Cruz Mexico. Charles caught Rubella and was hospitalized. The army and Peter moved on toward Mexico City. Charles got better and begged his doctor to release him. He went off to catch up, had a relapse and died on the road. Peter fought on and was seriously wounded in the battle of Chapulpec. He was struck by an almost spent grape shot, knocked down and left for dead. The wound was painful, left a nice scar, but was not fatal and so he recovered and was on guard duty until he returned home. After that war he and his family moved to Alachua County near Hawthorn and near the plantation of the Governor who was a cousin. When the War Between the States started, he remarked to his wife Elizabeth, “I’m glad I’m too old to go. I’ve seen enough blood and guts for any one lifetime.” However, shortly after the battle of Gettysburg, he was drafted (at 39 years of age) and assigned in August of 1863 to the Confederate Army at Cedar Key. He was later assigned to the 9th Regiment, Florida Infantry, Company E as a 1st Sgt and was present at the Battle of the Crater. When he returned home, his wife could not recognize him in the small group of returning soldiers he was among. He was standing in front of her and she began to cry. He said, “Why Elizabeth, don’t you know me?” He had lost a great deal of weight, his hair had turned gray, and he had long hair and beard. The war also apparently left him with bad emotional scars; his wife always said that he couldn’t take noise or conflict without leaving or blowing up. After the War, Peter Boyer Perry moved to a place in Marion County that took on his Mexican war pen name, “Pedro.” He received a small pension from the Mexican War until his death in 1899.

Pvt. Richard W. Follin, Co. B, 18th South Carolina, Wallace's Brigade, Bushrod Johnson's Division, Anderson's Corps was at Petersburg from from June 1864 till April 1865. The 18th South Carolina was stationed at the site of the crater when it blew up, but he was one of the few that lived through it. Heavy loses were suffered during the Battle of the Crater; of the 363 present, 205 were disabled. His pay stubs record him as being a team master, although he came from a rich family that owned a cotton plantation in Omoa, Honduras, but they were originally from Charleston, South Carolina. He was serving as acting consulate for the US to the port at Omoa, Honduras when the war began due to his elderly father's inability to continue in that same position. Because of this, he even joined the Confederate army under an assumed name to fool the Yankees if he was captured or killed, so that the family would stay in good name with the United States government. His real name was Charles Richard Follin.

Private Peter Kemp, Company I, 27th Georgia, died of typhoid in the Chimbrazo Hospital in Richmond in the winter of 1862.

Private Floyd Lemuel Hodges, Company E, 60th Alabama Infantry Regiment (Richard Anderson's Corps, Bushrod Johnson's Division, Young M. Moody's Alabama Brigade) took part in the Battle of White Oak Road on March 31, 1865 and was in the trenches at Petersburg on April 2, 1865. His name appears on a register of the CSA Hospital at Farmville, Virginia, where he was admitted on April 3,1865 for treatment of a gun shot wound, and was transferred home on May 13, 1865. Earlier battles: Chickamauga 9/19/1863 and 9/25/1863; Knoxville 11/28/1863; Bean's Station 1863; Drewry's Bluff 5/9/1864 and 5/10/1864; Richmond 5/12/1864.

Stanhope Washington Alexander of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina (he is possibly holding a P53 Enfield, Type 3, rifle and appears to be wearing an 1861 sack coat style of Confederate uniform). He enlisted in Company H, 35th North Carolina Regiment (Infantry), on October 26, 1864, in Mecklenburg County. He was captured at Dinwiddie Courthouse, Virginia, on April 1st, 1865, and confined at Hart''s Island in New York Harbor until June 18, 1865, when he was released after taking the Oath of Allegiance. He died on April 4, 1912, in South Carolina, and is buried in Laurelwood Cemetery in Rock Hill, South Carolina.

Private Stanhope Washington Alexander

Private Wiley Hodges was enlisted by Captain A.C. Gordon for 3 years into Company A, 3rd Battalion, Hilliard's Legion, Alabama Volunteers on August 11, 1862 at Abbeville, Alabama. He is shown as present on the muster rolls from June 1, 1862 - August 1863. By July 1864 he was a private in Company E, 60th Regiment, Alabama Infantry where he is shown as present on the muster rolls from July - August 1864 and Jan - Feb 1865. He was killed in the trenches near Petersburg, Virginia on February 8, 1865.

Private Samuel Lemuel Hodges, Company E, 60th Alabama was wounded at Chickamauga 20 Sep 1863 and killed in a successful counterattack on Union forces at Drewry's Bluff, Virginia on 16 May 1864. He was the brother of Wiley Hodges and the first cousin of Floyd Lemuel Hodges.

Nine Hodges first cousins all joined the same company on the same day at Tolbert Church, Henry County, Alabama. Company A of the 3rd Alabama Infanty Battalion later merged with the 60th Alabama. Coleman H. Hodges died of disease at Tazswell, Tennessee on September 7, 1862. Joseph Hodges was wounded March 31, 1865, in the right arm, on account of which he was sent home on furlough, and while there the war came to an end. Other records show that he was admitted to hospital April 3, 1865 with a gun shot wound to the right arm and furloughed April 8, 1865. Foreman Hosey Hodges was wounded at the Battle of Chickamauga, Tennessee and was present in the trenches before Petersburg, Virginia. Redding Hodges died February 15, 1864 at the prisoner of war camp at Rock Island, Illinois. Thomas Hodges entered service in 1862 at Tolbert Church, Henry County and later transfered to the 60th Alabama, Company E. He was wounded at Bean's Station, Tennessee on 14 December 1863, captured on 31 March 1865, and paroled on 10 June 1865 at Point Lookout Prison, Maryland. Jordan H. Hodges was present in the trenches before Petersburg, Virginia and apparently was the only one of the nine Hodges cousins not killed, captured or wounded.

Corporal Sidney B. Swan, Company B, 64th Regiment of Georgia Infantry, wrote this letter to his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Swan, Louisville, Georgia:

Savannah Georgia
Camp Bartow Des 14th 64

Dear Mother

I once more take my pen to write you a few lines. My health is as good now as it has been since I have been in service though for some time past I have been in bad health, our regiment is in better health now than it has been for a long time though I am afraid it wont hold out so, for our base is not as good here as it was in Florida. we neither get meal nor bacon We get pickeled beef and flour and no greece, some of our men are without tents ____ and some without shoes and bea____ of clothing. We left Camp Randolph Monday was a week a go and got here Tuesday last being on the road nine days. A part of the way we had to march through water and mud and a part of the way we rode on open cars. we camped thee [three] days at Seventeen Gulf and Pensacola R R We had wet weather nearly all the time one of our men died at 17 and 12 or 14 deserted one of them from our company we were ordered here in anticipation of an attact being made on Savannah I can see no signs of any fighting here though. Soldiers are poreing in from many parts and I expect there are a good many of them here I am wanting to go about amongst them soon and see who of them I know. where is Bill is he still at home. I have[n’t] heard from Tom nor any of the Boys since the last Big fight and would [be] more than glad to hear. I have heard nothing from you I cant tell the day when nor have I heard from Martha in two months. Where in the duce have you all got to.

Mother I never was as hungry in all my life as I was when I got here we had no[thing] on the way to eat but crackers and but few of them and some fat salt pork to eat with them and I dont want any thing worse to perish to death on. I had much rather had dry corn Bread and dry beef for salt porkI never did love. As well as I love it when it is fresh and we had to buy it at that. we got some good Bacon but we did not have any time to cook it. Every thing is out of seson so when a Soldier has a little money he has to give all of it for a mere nothing I have no news to tell you that would interest you. Capt John Philips Wife is dead She died not long ago I do not know what was the matter with her I am mighty afraid there is something the mater with my folks and they wont wr[I]te to me on that account. Tell Bill Scruggs to write to me for he is all the one in all your setlement I would give Five cents in Confederate money for. for all the rest of you have forgot me and I intend to forget all of you, tell all my old friends howdy for me and espeshly old cousin Betcy [Betsy] Scruggs. Some of the boys appear to be very anxious to face the yankees I cant Say that I am. we are ordered to keep our guns in trim Some of the boys are rubing up while I am writing I greesed my old musket last night and will clean her off as soon as I get this letter done. Tell Jane that I never will write to her again nor I aint certain that I will to any of you for there is no one on this earth that I wanted to hear from as bad as I did from Jack and She will not wr[I]te. Bill Scruggs said in his last letter that he had been sick and he was afraid he was dead. I have been away down in Florida But I have not changed I am Still the same old Sid that I always was and hope ever to be till deth takes me away. I had much rather stay here than in Florida if we could fare as well and had our houses that we built there. here and the same amount of wood the water is better and washes clothes much better

I hope the day will soon com when peace and goo[d]nes will return and all the ___hers [brothers] Can go home and the dr[ums] and strife and cannon and muskets and men of war will be hushed for ever. and if I never see you any more on this Earth I hope to meet you in a better world. I am as I ever was the same Affectionately your very son S. B. Swan

Private Matthew P. Hamilton, Company B, was wounded in the knee during the Battle of the Crater fighting on the left flank when the Yankees charged and started filling in the trenches. His Colonel, J.C.C. Saunders, was told by General Lee that they had to hold because there weren’t any reinforcements to support them. Matthew was sent to the Richmond hospitals afterward and later surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse with his brother Rivate Middleton A. Hamilton, who also served in Company B.

Private Joel Wenel English was born on 6 Jan 1845 in Macon County, Georgia, the son of Robert H. and Nancy Ann Kleckley English. He enlisted in Company A (Cutts’ Battery), Sumter Artillery, on 6 July 1861 at Americus, Georgia. The regiment was later mustered into the Confederate Army as 11th Georgia Artillery Battalion. He fought with his unit throughout the war. According to his Confederate Pension Application, he was with his unit when it surrendered and was paroled at Appomatox, Virginia on 9 Apr 1865. After the war he married Permelia Petrona Edge on 7 Jan 1866. His occupation was listed as a farmer in Macon County, Georgia in the 1870, 1880, and 1900 Federal censuses. He filed a Confederate Pension application as an Indigent Soldier on 20 Jun 1907, indicating that he was paralyzed, destitute, unable to work, had no assets, and had received financial assistance from members of his family for several years. He died on 17 Sep 1914 and is buried at Andersonville Baptist Church Cemetery, Sumter County, Georgia. His headstone states "11th GA Arty CSA."

Private Joseph E. English was born on 1 Mar 1831 in Macon County, Georgia, the son of Sampson J. and Frances Hardison English. He married Sarah Catherine Williams on 11 December 1855. He enlisted in Company D (Blackshear’s Battery), 11th Georgia Artillery Battalion (Sumter Artillery), on 15 May 1862 at Americus, Georgia. On 4 October 1862, Blackshear’s Battery was disbanded when the battalion was reorganized and he was reassigned to Battery A. He fought with his unit throughout the war. According to his Confederate Pension Application, he was wounded in the left hand at Gettysburg, which eventually resulted in paralysis of his left arm. Also according to his pension application, he was not with his unit when it surrendered at Appomattox, Virginia because part of his unit was cut off from Lee’s army. They were disbanded and ordered to Lincolnton, North Carolina, where they were captured and paroled on or about 19 April 1965. His occupation was listed as a farmer in Macon County, Georgia in the 1860, 1870, and 1880 Federal censuses. He filed his first Pension application as an Indigent Soldier on 1 January 1897, and filed additional pension applications for the years 1898, 1899, 1900, 1902, and 1903. The various pension applications indicated a number of debilitating health problems including paralysis of the left arm, infection by “lagrippe” (influenza), which affected him mentally and from which he never recovered, bronchitis, and heart problems. He was destitute, unable to work, had no assets, and had received financial assistance from his sons for several years. He died on 29 May 1903 and is buried in the English Family Cemetery near Oglethorpe in Macon County, Georgia. His headstone states "Co A 11th GA Arty CSA."

Joseph E. English

Private Thomas H. English was born on 25 February 1835 in Macon County, Georgia, the son of Sampson J. and Frances Hardison English. He married Elizabeth A. Virginia Higgins on 30 November 1858. He enlisted in Company D (Blackshear’s Battery), 11th Georgia Artillery Battalion (Sumter Artillery), on 15 May 1862 at Americus, Georgia. On 4 October 1862, Blackshear’s Battery was disbanded when the battalion was reorganized and he was reassigned to Battery A. He fought with his unit throughout the war. According to his brother Joseph E. English’s Confederate Pension application, on which Thomas is indicated as a witness, Thomas was not with his unit when it surrendered at Appomattox, Virginia because part of his unit was cut off from Lee’s army. They were disbanded and ordered to Lincolnton, North Carolina, where they were captured and paroled on or about 19 April 1865. His occupation was listed as a farmer in the 1860, 1870, 1880, and 1900 Federal censuses. He died 1 Sepember 1907 and is buried in the English Family Cemetery near Oglethorpe in Macon County, Georgia. His headstone states "Co A 11th GA Arty CSA."

Private John G. Rowland, Company H, 57th North Carolina Troops, died of smallpox in November of 1864 at Camp Chase POW camp near Columbus, Ohio. When his father and brother went off to war together in 1861 and served in the 28th North Carolina, John remained home to take care of the family and the farm in Stanly County. When his father, Mathias Rowland, was mustered out for "debility and advanced age" in early 1862, John joined the regiment which participated in every important battle of the Army of Northern Virginia until the late summer of 1864 after Early's attack on Washington. The 57th North Carolina Troops and another veteran North Carolina regiment were routed at Stephenson's Depot near Winchester, John was captured and sent to Wheeling, then to Camp Chase.

Private William Henry H. Bellflower joined Company F (the "Pulaski Blues") of the 31st Regment, Georgia Infantry on October 27, 1861 and was killed at Cold Harbor, Virginia on June 27, 1862. His brothers, Samuel and Leander Bellflower, served in Company K, (the "Pulaski Greys") of the 49th Regiment, Georgia Infantry.

Private William Wesley Sell, Company K, 45th North Carolina Troops, from Forsyth County was killed in action at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863.

Private Reason J. Davis, Company E, 60th Alabama Infantry (formerly Company A, 3rd Battalion, Hilliard's Legion) was killed in action at the Battle of White Oak Road three days before the Breakthrough Battle at Petersburg fought on April 2, 1865.

Privates Solomon and William Hartline, Company C, 48th North Carolina Troops, were brothers who had three other brothers serving in the 11th North Carolina. William was killed in action at Winchester and Solomon was killed in action at Antietam.

Brother's Corporal Henry H. Beecher, Private William A. Beecher and Private Wilson F. Beecher of the 27th Georgia Infantry were from Appling County, Georgia. Combined, they were wounded 6 times in the war but all 3 survived.

Private Jessie J. Clements, Company B (Brown Rifles, Putnam County) 3rd Regiment Georgia Infantry was injured at Second Battle of Manassas. He later enlisted in Prudent's Battery and was discharged in 1865.

Private Alexander Holden, Company E (The Lancaster Guard), 22nd South Carolina Infantry, was at Petersburg during the Battle of the Crater when 216 soldiers of the regiment were killed or wounded by the mine explosion.

 

If you are a descendant or family member of a Confederate soldier who served in the Petersburg Campaign and would like to be listed on the Descendants Roll Call, please send an e-mail by clicking the mail icon below. Type the name of the regiment in the subject line and provide details in the message.

 

Not For Fame Or Reward
Not For Place Or For Rank
Not Lured By Ambition
Or Goaded By Necessity
But In Simple
Obedience To Duty
As They Understood It
These Men Suffered All - Sacrificed All
Dared all - And Died

 

Inscription written by Dr. Randolph Harrison McKim and carved

on the north side of the Confederate Memorial (sculpted by Moses Ezekiel)

at Arlington National Cemetery

 

Important Links

Two Brothers: One North, One South

by David H. Jones

The Final Battles of the Petersburg

Campaign by A. Wilson Greene

 

Pamplin Historical Park & National

Museum of the Civil War Soldier

 

Ordering Service & Pension Records

National Archives

 

Telling Their Story ... A Young Man

Embraces His Confederate Heritage

 

 

 

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