Albemarle Artillery

Descendants Association

12th Battalion, Virginia Light Artillery

Soldier's Notes

 

Ansfield Shiflett, born 07 May 1837 in Albemarle County, Virginia, enlisted as a private on 17 March 1862 in the 88th Virginia Militia Regiment and was transferred to the Albemarle Light Artillery on 01 May 1862. He was detailed on 01 September 1864 as teamster at Battalion Headquarters and paroled on 17 May 1865 at Centreville, Virginia. He died on 31 August 1906 at Blackwell's Hollow, Virginia. It was widely told after the war that Ansfield fired 200 consecutive rounds from his gun without relief during one of the actions involving Sturdivant's Battlery.

Ansfield Shiflett at a Confederate reunion in Richmond, Virginia

Levi G. Shiflett of Greene County, Virginia enlisted as a private in the Albemarle Light Artillery on 13 January 1864 and was paroled on 17 May 1865 at Centreville, Virginia.

Milton B. Shiflett enlisted as a private on 17 March 1862 in the 88th Virginia Militia Regiment and transfered to the Albemarle Light Artillery on 01 May 1862. He returned on 17 June 1862, was hospitalized on 28 April 1863 at Episcopal Church Hospital in Williamsburg (with anasarca) and hospitalized on 26 June 1863 at Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond (with typhoid fever). Milton was furloughed on 31 July 1863 (for 30 days), hospitalized on 24 February 1864 at Episcopal Church Hospital (with pneumonia) and furloughed on 13 March 1864 at Page County, Virginia (for 60 days).

Henry B. Shiflett, a farm laborer from Fredericksville Parish, Virginia enlisted as a private in the 88th Virginia Militia Regiment on 17 March 1862 and was transferred to the Albemarle Light Artillery on 01 May 1862. He deserted on 15 July 1863.

Thomas Solomon Shiflett, a farm laborer from Fredericksville Parish, Virginia enlisted as a private on 17 March 1862 at the age of 20 in the 88th Virginia Militia Regiment and transferred to the Albemarle Light Artillery on 01 May 1862. He received a disability discharge on 05 May 1862 in Camp Lee, Richmond, Virginia.

Horace Walker Via received his nickname "Bee" when a neighbor observed him working in the tobacoo field and remarked to his father, Ira, "your son is as busy as a bee". He served in place of either his father, Ira, or his brother, Chris, in the Civil War. Horace served as a private in the 88th Virginia Militia, Sturdivant's Company of Light Artillery and enlisted May 1, 1862 at Richmond, Virginia. Horace was detailed with horses to Lynchburg in January of 1864 and was listed as a wheelwright. On August 1, 1870, Horace filed a homestead exemption on his land. This could have stemmed as a result of the aftermath of the Civil War. He stated he was a householder and head of a family. His property included a mule, a horse, a cow, two yearlings, one calf, one sow and five pigs, plows, hoes, axe, plow gear, a two horse wagon, and household and kitchen furniture. His land and crops were valued $300. Family legend has it that Horace got into some kind of trouble and left Albemarle County. This story has not been verified, but by 1880 Horace had disappeared from Albemarle County. His wife Lucille Drucilla and her children were living in the household of Horace's father and mother, Ira Howard and Amanda Via.

Private Lewis Skidmore Clements enlisted on June 11,1861 and served until captured after the Union Sixth Corps broke the Confederate lines near Petersburg on April 2, 1865. He survived the war and died on September 20,1924 at the Lee Camp Soldiers Home in Richmond Virginia.

Private Douglas Reginald Carter enlisted in Company A of the 12th Battalion of the Virginia Light Artillery commanded by Nathaniel A. Sturdivant on 1 March 1862. Sturdivant's Battery was offically organized on 19 March 1862 with 36 men, one being Douglas Reginald Carter (commonly went by D. R. Carter). On 1 May 1862 D. R. Carter was appointed artificer. From 30 Sept 1863 to 31 Dec 1863 was listed as a harness maker, employed on extra duty at Fort Clifton. Listed as detailed harness maker at battalion headquarters 30 April 1864. Drew clothing 29 Aug 1864. On company muster roll for Sept/Oct 1864 and Nov/Dec 1864 and on receipt roll for extra pay as a harness maker. Paroled but possibly not present at Appomattox, 9 April 1865.

 

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The Remembrance Wall

At The National Museum Of The Civil War Soldier

Another Great Way To Honor The Memory Of Your American Soldier

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